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Medalia Jubilară Carol I

Carol I Jubilee Medal

Carol I Jubilee Medal was instituted on December 28, 1905 by the Royal Decree No.5384 in conjunction with the 40th jubilee of enthronement of Carol I as a ruler of Romania. Initially Karl Eitel Friedrich Zephyrinus Ludwig von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (20.04.1839-10.10.1914) was elected ruler, or Domnitor of the Romanian United Principalities (10.05.1866-15.03.1881), аnd then proclaimed King of Romania on May 10, 1881.

Medalia Jubilară Carol I was widely issued and is regarded as one of the most distributed Romanian decorations. Thus, it was awarded to state officials of all the territorial entities, civilian and religious officials, active military personnel, reservists and members of the home guard, former ministers and deputies of the Parliament. 

It seems that design of the Carol I Jubilee Medal was inspired by the Bavarian Jubiläumsmedaille für die Armee 1905. The medal had a shape of a vertical oval and measured 31х38 mm.

Carol I Jubilee Medal was instituted in two versions, for military personnel and civilian officials. Both types had the same obverse, but differed in design of its reverse.

An obverse showed a bust of Carol I facing left encircled in its upper part by an inscription in capital letters “Carol I King of Romania” (“Carol I Rege Al României”). Hallmarks of two engravers, viz. “P.Telge” and “Carniol Fiul” are found at the bottom of the bust. Paul Telge (1850-04(05).06.1902) was a well-known Berlin jeweler who subsequently served under the first Romanian King Carol I and Queen consort Elisabeth. Marcus Corniol (“Fiul”, or “Son” stood for distinguishing him from his father, Moise Corniul) was a well-known engraver from Bucharest. Medals without hallmarks were minted as well.

A reverse of the medal for civilian officials (Varianta Civilă) bore an image of the middle Romanian coat of arms and two dates in semicircle, “1866” and “1906” separated by a hexagram, at the bottom.

As there was no strict description of a reverse for the medal for military personnel, several variants were minted by various manufacturers.

1. A reverse without border with an inscription in capital letters in its centre in seven horizontal lines: “In Memory of the 40th Anniversary Of My Reign” (“În Amintirea Anului Al 40lea Al Căpităniei Mele”). Two vertically-oriented dates, “1866” and “1906” are situated on the left and on the right.

2. As above, but with border.

3. A reverse with border, inscription as described above, but dates “1866-1906” are placed at the bottom and are separated from the inscription by a short horizontal line.

4. A reverse without border with an inscription in capital letters in its centre in six horizontal lines: “In Memory of the 40th Anniversary Of Reign” (“În Amintirea Anului Al 40lea Al Căpităniei”). Word “My” (“Mele”) as well as dates were added by hand-stamping.

Depending on a manufacturer, medals differed in minor details, e.g. design of a bust, width of letters, etc.

Medalia Jubilară Carol I was manufactured of bronze and was worn suspended from a red silk ribbon with thin yellow stripes at its edges. Wide light blue stripe with central thin black stripe flanked by white stripes was situated in the middle.

Award document of a single design bore the date “May 10, 1906”, i.e. the date of the 40th jubilee of the reign of Carol I.

Carol I Jubilee Medal 1